What is the difference between Bareboat and Charter?

The difference between bareboat and charter

is that "bareboat" is being or pertaining to a charter for the hire of a boat without any crew or provisions included and "charter" is a document issued by some authority, creating a public or private institution, and defining its purposes and privileges.

bareboat

charter

Adjective

  • Being or pertaining to a charter for the hire of a boat without any crew or provisions included.

Noun

  • A document issued by some authority, creating a public or private institution, and defining its purposes and privileges.
  • A similar document conferring rights and privileges on a person, corporation etc.
  • A contract for the commercial leasing of a vessel, or space on a vessel.
  • The temporary hiring or leasing of a vehicle.
  • A deed (legal contract).
  • A special privilege, immunity, or exemption.
  • (Britain, derogatory, in a noun phrase with another noun which is either an agent or action) a provision whose unintended consequence would be to encourage an undesirable activity

Examples

  • My mother, / Who has a charter to extol her blood, / When she does praise me, grieves me.
  • In what Derbyshire police say amounts to a “thieves’ charter,” three judges ruled that because the car’s identity had been changed it was impossible to trace the legal owner and therefore the person found in possession of it was entitled to keep it.

Adjective

  • Leased or hired.

Verb

  • (transitive) To grant or establish a charter.
  • (transitive) To lease or hire something by charter.
  • (transitive, Canada, law) (of a peace officer) To inform (an arrestee) of their constitutional rights under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms upon arrest.