What is the difference between Birds and Wildfowl?

The difference between birds and wildfowl

is that “birds” is a member of the class of animals Aves in the phylum Chordata, characterized by being warm-blooded, having feathers and wings usually capable of flight, and laying eggs and “wildfowl” is any wild bird such as ducks, geese or swans.

birds

wildfowl

Noun

  • A member of the class of animals Aves in the phylum Chordata, characterized by being warm-blooded, having feathers and wings usually capable of flight, and laying eggs.
  • (obsolete) A chicken; the young of a fowl; a young eaglet; a nestling.

Synonyms

  • (member of class Aves): fowl, avian
  • (man): chap, bloke, guy
  • (woman): broad, chick, dame, girl, lass
  • woman
  • girl

Hyponyms

  • bird

Exemple

  • Ducks and sparrows are birds.
  • The level below this is called the Phylum; birds belong to the Phylum Chordata, which includes all the vertebrate animals and a few odds and ends.
  • He once took in his own mother, and was robbed by a ‘pal,’ who thought he was a doctor. Oh, he’s a rare bird is ‘Gentleman Joe’!
  • The door opened and a tall hungry-looking bird with a cane and a big nose came in neatly, shut the door behind him against the pressure of the door closer, marched over to the desk and placed a wrapped parcel on the desk.
  • “Ah, he’s a funny bird,” said Phaedra, throwing a leg over the sill.
  • And by my word! the bonny bird / In danger shall not tarry.
  • The usual visual grammar was in place – a carpet in the street, people in paddocks awaiting a brush with something glamorous, blokes with earpieces, birds in frocks of colliding colours that if sighted in nature would indicate the presence of poison.
  • “All these fantastic birds, long hair, made up, false eyelashes and things, crowding round this group of scabby, spotty teenagers," marveled Anderson.
  • Mike went out with his bird last night.
  • But all of a sudden though, just through the smoke / It’s your bird laughing and joking with a bloke / Ain’t just that either, as she moves closer / In a shape what looks like they’re lovers, he’s tonguing her!
  • Deployment of the fourth bird “should ensure that Inmarsat has sufficient capacity in orbit in the early 1990s, taking into account the possibility of launch failures and the age of some of the spacecraft in the Inmarsat first generation system
  • Will a government- backed APSTAR satellite knock out a planned AsiaSat II bird?
  • In reality, the Air Force was never able to place a bird in orbit that quickly.
  • That ungentle gull, the cuckoo’s bird.
  • The brydds [birds] of the aier have nestes.

Verb

  • (intransitive) To observe or identify wild birds in their natural environment.
  • (intransitive) To catch or shoot birds.
  • (intransitive, figurative) To seek for game or plunder; to thieve.

Noun

  • Any wild bird such as ducks, geese or swans.
  • Waterfowl.

Examples

  • […] Whoso seeks an audit here
  • Propitious, pays his tribute, game or fish,
  • Wildfowl or ven’son, and his errand speeds.
  • In these early days of the journey we eat well. We have brought salted meat, flour, beans, dried fruit, and there are wildfowl to shoot.

Verb

  • To hunt wildfowl.

Examples

  • The hunting of the kind of winged creatures, taken as a whole, is called wildfowling.