What is the difference between Carbide and Graphite?

The difference between carbide and graphite

is that “carbide” is any binary compound of carbon and a more electropositive element and “graphite” is an allotrope of carbon, consisting of planes of carbon atoms arranged in hexagonal arrays with the planes stacked loosely, that is used as a dry lubricant and in “lead” pencils.

carbide

graphite

Noun

  • (chemistry) Any binary compound of carbon and a more electropositive element
  • (chemistry) The polyatomic ion C22−, or any of its salts.
  • (chemistry) The monatomic ion C4−, or any of its salts.
  • (chemistry) A carbon-containing alloy or doping of a metal or semiconductor, such as steel.
  • (chemistry) Tungsten carbide.
  • (cycling) trivial name for calcium carbide (CaC2), used to produce acetylene in bicycle lamps in the early 1900s.

Noun

  • An allotrope of carbon, consisting of planes of carbon atoms arranged in hexagonal arrays with the planes stacked loosely, that is used as a dry lubricant and in “lead” pencils.
  • Short for graphite-reinforced plastic, a composite plastic made with graphite fibers noted for light weight strength and stiffness.
  • A grey colour.

Synonyms

  • (allotrope of carbon): plumbago, black lead
  • (composite plastic): carbon fiber reinforced plastic, carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer, graphite composite, CFRP, CRP

Examples

  • Technical terms like ferrite, perlite, graphite, and hardenite were bandied to and fro, and when Paget glibly brought out such a rare exotic as ferro-molybdenum, Benson forgot that he was a master ship-builder, […]
  • Modern tennis racquets are made of graphite, fibreglass and other man-made materials.