What is the difference between Escape and Skip?

The difference between escape and skip

is that "escape" is to get free; to free oneself and "skip" is to move by hopping on alternate feet.

escape

skip

Verb

  • (intransitive) To get free; to free oneself.
  • (transitive) To avoid (any unpleasant person or thing); to elude, get away from.
  • (intransitive) To avoid capture; to get away with something, avoid punishment.
  • (transitive) To elude the observation or notice of; to not be seen or remembered by.
  • (transitive, computing) To cause (a single character, or all such characters in a string) to be interpreted literally, instead of with any special meaning it would usually have in the same context, often by prefixing with another character.
  • (computing) To halt a program or command by pressing a key (such as the “Esc” key) or combination of keys.

Exemple

  • The prisoners escaped by jumping over a wall.
  • The factory was evacuated after toxic gases escaped from a pipe.
  • sailors that escaped the wreck
  • Luiz was Chelsea’s stand-out performer, although Ferguson also had a case when he questioned how the £21m defender escaped a red card after the break for a hack at Rooney, with the Brazilian having already been booked.
  • It is tempting to speculate about the incentives or compulsions that might explain why anyone would take to the skies in [the] basket [of a balloon]: perhaps out of a desire to escape the gravity of this world or to get a preview of the next; […].
  • He only got a fine and so escaped going to jail.
  • The children climbed out of the window to escape the fire.
  • Luckily, I escaped with only a fine.
  • The name of the hotel escapes me at present.
  • They escaped the search of the enemy.
  • If the data for a URI component would conflict with the reserved purpose, then the conflicting data must be escaped before forming the URI.
  • Character Data tags allow you to place complex strings as the text of an element—without the need to manually escape the string.
  • Therefore, what follows is a list of typical output functions; your job is to determine if any of the functions print out tainted data that has not been passed through some sort of HTML escaping function.
  • When using the “bash” shell, you can escape the ampersand character with a backslash.
  • Brion escaped the double quote character on Windows by adding a second double quote within the literal.

Noun

  • The act of leaving a dangerous or unpleasant situation.
  • Leakage or outflow, as of steam or a liquid, or an electric current through defective insulation.
  • (computing) escape key
  • (programming) The text character represented by 27 (decimal) or 1B (hexadecimal).
  • (snooker) A successful shot from a snooker position.
  • (manufacturing) A defective product that is allowed to leave a manufacturing facility.
  • (obsolete) That which escapes attention or restraint; a mistake, oversight, or transgression.
  • (obsolete) A sally.
  • (architecture) An apophyge.

Exemple

  • The prisoners made their escape by digging a tunnel.
  • You forgot to insert an escape in the datastream.
  • I should have been more accurate, corrected all those former escapes.
  • thousand escapes of wit

Verb

  • (intransitive) To move by hopping on alternate feet.
  • (intransitive) To leap about lightly.
  • (intransitive) To skim, ricochet or bounce over a surface.
  • (transitive) To throw (something), making it skim, ricochet, or bounce over a surface.
  • (transitive) To disregard, miss or omit part of a continuation (some item or stage).
  • To place an item in a skip.
  • (transitive, informal) Not to attend (some event, especially a class or a meeting).
  • (transitive, informal) To leave, especially in a sudden and covert manner.
  • To leap lightly over.
  • To jump rope.
  • (knitting, crocheting) To pass by a stitch as if it were not there, continuing with the next stitch.

Synonyms

  • (informal, not to attend): (US) play hookie

Examples

  • She will skip from one end of the sidewalk to the other.
  • The lamb thy riot dooms to bleed to-day, / Had he thy reason, would he skip and play?
  • So she drew her mother away skipping, dancing, and frisking fantastically.
  • The hosts maintained their discipline and shape, even threatening to grab a second goal on the break – left-back Dan Harding made a scintillating run, skipping past a few challenges before prodding a right-footed shot that did not match his build-up.
  • The rock will skip across the pond.
  • After Essien’s poor attempt flew into the stands, Rodrigo Moreno – Bolton’s on-loan winger from Benfica who was making his full Premier League debut – nearly exposed the Blues with a lovely ball for Johan Elmander, but it just skipped away from his team-mate’s toes.
  • I bet I can skip this rock to the other side of the pond.
  • My heart will skip a beat.
  • I will read most of the book, but skip the first chapter because the video covered it.
  • But they who have not this doubt, and have a mind to see the issue of the Theory, may skip these two Chapters, if they please, and proceed to the following
  • Yeah, I really should go to the quarterly meeting but I think I’m going to skip it.
  • to skip the country
  • a customer who skipped town without paying her hotel bill
  • I see ya’ little speed boat head up our coast
  • She really want to skip town
  • Get back off me, beast off me
  • Get back you flea-infested mongrel
  • to skip the rope
  • The girls were skipping in the playground.

Noun

  • A leaping, jumping or skipping movement.
  • The act of passing over an interval from one thing to another; an omission of a part.
  • (music) A passage from one sound to another by more than a degree at once.
  • A person who attempts to disappear so as not to be found.
  • (radio) skywave propagation

Examples

  • Tracking down debtors is a big part of a skip tracer’s job. That’s the case because deadbeats who haven’t paid their bills and have disappeared are the most common type of skips.