What is the difference between Shovel and Dragline?

The difference between shovel and dragline

is that "shovel" is a hand tool with a handle, used for moving portions of material such as earth, snow, and grain from one place to another, with some forms also used for digging. Not to be confused with a spade, which is designed solely for small-scale digging and incidental tasks such as chopping of small roots and "dragline" is a cable, cord, or rope used to drag an object; specifically, the line of a dragline excavator that drags the bucket.

shovel

dragline

Noun

  • A hand tool with a handle, used for moving portions of material such as earth, snow, and grain from one place to another, with some forms also used for digging. Not to be confused with a spade, which is designed solely for small-scale digging and incidental tasks such as chopping of small roots.
  • (US) A spade.

Verb

  • To move materials with a shovel.
  • (transitive, figurative) To move with a shoveling motion.

Related terms

  • shove

Exemple

  • The workers were shovelling gravel and tarmac into the pothole in the road.
  • After the blizzard, we shoveled the driveway for the next two days.
  • I don’t mind shoveling, but using a pickaxe hurts my back terribly.
  • Already late for work, I shovelled breakfast into my mouth as fast as possible.
  • The keeper then seemed to claw it out with fabulous reflexes only for TV replays to show the ball had most probably crossed the line before Forster had shovelled it away.

Noun

  • A cable, cord, or rope used to drag an object; specifically, the line of a dragline excavator that drags the bucket.
  • Short for dragline excavator.

Examples

  • Drainboard had been terrified by a narrow escape from the jumping spider’s dragline. He had twisted it twice around her cerci and told her, “Your new name is Supper, for that’s what you will be in a few hours. My supper.”
  • De Gier had rowed out to where the yacht was anchored, fished up the anchor with a dragline, ascertained that the anchor cable had been cut.
  • Everything about the Eagle [a hot-air balloon] spoke of professionalism. For extra power it had three sails, comprising 818 square feet of silk, which hung like aprons from its midriff. Its steering was provided by three drag-lines, measuring 3,300 feet in total but of unequal lengths to prevent them tangling. […] Ingeniously, the drag-lines were also to act as ballast, Andrée’s theory being that if the balloon lost height a greater length of rope would rest on the ground, thus increasing its buoyancy.
  • A dragline excavator has a large cutting bucket suspended from the end of a boom. The operator first lowers the bucket mouth down where earth is to be removed, then a second cable—the dragline—pulls the bucket across the surface. The weight of the bucket and the pull of the dragline make a blade at the mouth of the bucket dig into the topsoil, filling the bucket as it moves. When the bucket is full, its contents are tipped by lifting and inverting the bucket over a waiting dump truck.
  • Spiders rely on silk “draglines” to become airborne and for subsequent transport. Numerical simulations […] suggest that these draglines are flexible and can become contorted by both stretching and twisting. These flexible, extendible draglines enable the spiders to rise in the air column and follow the flow of air, promoting relatively long-distance travel.
  • The use of a head collar or harness along with a dragline allows easy access to the pet and rapid interruption of the behavior sequence and redirection of the pet to a more appropriate activity such as attention directed toward toys or food puzzles.
  • The drainage ditches were constructed with a dragline and were of sufficient width so that it was considered unnecessary to deepen or clear them during the course of the study.
  • In smaller lagoons , a backhoe is more efficient, while larger lagoons may require the use of a clamshell or a dragline for mixing.