What is the difference between Stilettos and Heels?

The difference between stilettos and heels

is that “stilettos” is a small, slender knife or dagger-like weapon intended for stabbing and “heels” is the rear part of the foot, where it joins the leg.

stilettos

heels

Noun

  • A small, slender knife or dagger-like weapon intended for stabbing.
  • A rapier.
  • An awl.
  • A woman’s shoe with a tall, slender heel (called a stiletto heel).
  • A beard trimmed into a pointed form.

Exemple

  • “There the cause of death was soon ascertained ; the victim of this daring outrage had been stabbed to death from ear to ear with a long, sharp instrument, in shape like an antique stiletto, which […] was subsequently found under the cushions of the hansom. […]"
  • The very quack of fashions, the very he that / Wears a stiletto on his chin.

Adjective

  • Sharp and narrow like a stiletto.

Exemple

  • Her stiletto heels would cause damage if she ever stepped on someone’s foot with them.

Verb

  • (transitive) To attack or kill with a stiletto (dagger).

Exemple

  • The recollection of former atrocities by the populace in plundering the city and stilettoing the inhabitants, is sufficiently fresh in the remembrance of the government to serve as an additional stimulus to prevent similar disorders.

Noun

  • (anatomy) The rear part of the foot, where it joins the leg.
  • The part of a shoe’s sole which supports the foot’s heel.
  • The rear part of a sock or similar covering for the foot.
  • The part of the palm of a hand closest to the wrist.
  • (usually in the plural) A woman’s high-heeled shoe.
  • (firearms) The back, upper part of the stock.
  • The last or lowest part of anything.
  • (US, Ireland, Australia) A crust end-piece of a loaf of bread.
  • (US) The base of a bun sliced in half lengthwise.
  • A contemptible, inconsiderate or thoughtless person.
  • (card games) The cards set aside for later use in a patience or solitaire game.
  • (architecture) The lower end of a timber in a frame, as a post or rafter.
  • (specifically, US) The obtuse angle of the lower end of a rafter set sloping.
  • (carpentry) The short side of an angled cut.
  • (golf) The part of a club head’s face nearest the shaft.
  • The lower end of the bit (cutting edge) of an axehead; as opposed to the toe (upper end).
  • In a carding machine, the part of a flat nearest the cylinder.

Synonyms

  • (end of bread): ender, outsider (Scotland)

Antonyms

  • (headlining wrestler): babyface
  • (angled cut in carpentry): toe

Examples

  • He [the stag] calls to mind his strength and then his speed, / His winged heels and then his armed head.
  • He drove the heel of his hand into the man’s nose.
  • She’d been wearing heels, and fell backward off her right heel and twisted or broke her ankle.
  • Opting to improve her odds of making it up the stairs and into the privacy of her room, she kicked off her left heel, and then her right before leaning down to scoop them up.
  • Flat shoes. As she pushed off her left heel and pressed the sole of her foot to the cold floor she looked forward to them.
  • the heel of a mast
  • the heel of a vessel
  • And then again the sportsmen would move at an undertaker’s pace, when the fox had traversed and the hounds would be at a loss to know which was the hunt and which was the heel
  • the heel of the white loaf
  • Boiled mutton was in one, and the heel of a damper in another.
  • `Have ye seen,’ said Uncle Jobson with basilisk severity, `what’s become of the heel of to-day’s loaf?’
  • The bottom half, or the bun heel is placed in the carton, and the pickle slices spread evenly over the meat or cheese.
  • Freedman began his analysis by noting two important facts about professional wrestling: First, that heels triumph considerably more often than do babyfaces […]

Verb

  • To follow at somebody’s heels; to chase closely.
  • To add a heel to, or increase the size of the heel of (a shoe or boot).
  • To kick with the heel.
  • (transitive) To perform by the use of the heels, as in dancing, running, etc.
  • (golf, transitive) To hit (the ball) with the heel of the club.
  • (American football, transitive) To make (a fair catch) standing with one foot forward, the heel on the ground and the toe up.

Examples

  • She called to her dog to heel.